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Student Loans

Additional Information and Assistance

stop sign Scam Alert!

Beware of student loan assistance companies that charge high fees to do what you can do for free!

Borrowers of student loans may receive mailings or see websites promising to help them manage their student debt. Signs of a student loan assistance scam include:

United States Department of Educationexternal link icon

The United States Department of Education oversees the federal student loan program. You can contact the U.S. Department of Education if you have questions, suggestions, or concerns about the student loan process. You can also give feedbackexternal link icon to the U.S. Department of Education to file a complaint, report suspicious activity, or provide suggestions.

Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB)

Another federal agency, the Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureauexternal link icon (CFPB) has authority to address various student loan issues for both federal and private loans. You can contact the CFPB Student Loan Ombudsmanexternal link icon to share your experiences, suggestions, and concerns about student loans.

National Consumer Law Center (NCLC)external link icon

The National Consumer Law Center, a nonprofit consumer legal and advocacy group, has established a Student Loan Borrower Assistance Projectexternal link icon that provides information about student loan rights and responsibilities. The Student Loan Borrower Assistance Websiteexternal link icon is a website resource that many borrowers indicate is helpful on many student loan topics.

Lutheran Social Servicesexternal link icon

The Minnesota Legislature provided funding for a student loan financial counseling program through Lutheran Social Services, a nonprofit organization. If you need assistance in exploring available options for repaying your student loans, Lutheran Social Services may be available to help individuals navigate repayment options, help determine eligibility for alternative programs, and help develop an individualized action plan. This financial counseling program is free and confidential. In-person appointments are available across Minnesota. Phone or skype appointment options are also available. Contact the Lutheran Social Services Student Loan Counseling Program hereexternal link icon or call toll-free: 1-888-577-2227.

Minnesota Attorney General’s Office

If you are having trouble with a lender, a debt collector, or a student loan servicer, the Minnesota Attorney General’s Office may be able to help.

There are several ways to contact our office:


First, you may telephone our office Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at (651) 296-3353 (Twin Cities Calling Area) or (800) 657-3787 (Outside the Twin Cities). Our phones are answered by trained consumer specialists who may be able to answer your questions or point you in the right direction.

Second, you may write a letter to the Office. Your letter should provide the name and contact information of the company you are having trouble with, an explanation of what the problem is, and pertinent information about the amount of your loan and the nature of your problem. You may send this letter to our office at the following address:

Office of Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson
445 Minnesota Street, Suite 1400
St. Paul, MN 55101

Or you may email your letter to: attorney.general@ag.state.mn.us

Third, you may download the Consumer Assistance Request Form and mail or email it to our office as follows:

Office of Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson
445 Minnesota Street, Suite 1400
St. Paul, MN 55101
attorney.general@ag.state.mn.us