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Beware of "Can You Hear Me?" Scam Calls

“Can you hear me?” “Are you there?” “Is this you?” Most people have been asked these questions in a phone call. News outlets and organizations across the country report that people are receiving calls from individuals who ask questions designed to get a “yes” answer.  But responding “yes” may leave people on the hook for more nuisance calls and maybe even unauthorized charges.  This new scheme is called the “Can You Hear Me?” Scam.

The Calls Go Like This:

“Chris” received a call while he was eating dinner. He answered the call, and a person asked, “Can you hear me?” Chris replied “yes.”  He then heard a recording that claimed he had won a free cruise. Chris realized the call may be part of a scam and hung up.

How the Scam Works

The details of this scam vary, but it always begins with a call, usually from a telephone number that appears to be local. When the person answers the call, the scam artist tries to get the person to say “yes”—most often by asking, “Can you hear me?,” “Is this the lady of the house?,” or a similar question. By responding “yes,” people notify robo-callers that their number is an active telephone number that can be sold to other telemarketers for a higher price. This then leads to more unwanted calls.

In some cases, the caller may record the person saying “yes.” Scam artists may be able to use a recorded “yes” to claim that the person authorized charges to his or her credit card or account. How can scammers access your account?  Some companies share their customers’ information with third‑party companies or allow third parties to charge customers’ accounts (called “cramming”) in exchange for payment. Scam artists may also obtain financial information from data breaches or leaks or through identity theft.

How to Protect Yourself

Whether the “Can you hear me?” calls are simply nuisance calls or something more sinister, there are steps you can take to avoid falling victim to phone scams.

Reporting Unwanted Calls

If you receive a call that may be part of a “Can You Hear Me?” scam, you should report it to the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”). The FTC has the authority to enforce federal laws regulating nuisance calls and interstate fraud over the telephone. The FTC may be reached as follows:

Federal Trade Commission
Consumer Response Center
600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20580
(877) 382-4357
TTY: (866) 653-4261
www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov External Link

For more information, or to file a complaint, contact the Office of Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson as follows:

Office of Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson
445 Minnesota Street, Suite 1400
St. Paul, MN 55101
(651) 296-3353 (Twin Cities Calling Area)
(800) 657-3787 (Outside the Twin Cities)
TTY: (651) 297-7206 or TTY: (800) 366-4812

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Smartphone Scams

People use their smartphones for everything from sending and receiving text messages and e-mails, to surfing the Internet, listening to music, and downloading “apps.” While these functions can keep people connected, they can also make folks vulnerable to scams.

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One increasingly common technique scam artists use is to falsify or “spoof” their caller ID information with local phone numbers or information to make it look like the calls are from a nearby person or business. While the caller’s information may appear local, the calls are often placed by scam artists who are located outside the state or country.